From Greg: Worldview Conversion

Dear Pastors and Ministry Leaders:

Greg Williams

Because we humans are “prone to wander,” those of us called by God to serve within the church as under-shepherds must join Jesus, the Great Shepherd, in protecting his flock from harm (Acts 20:28). This is a vital calling, given the many forces in our day that threaten our members, including the devil’s schemes to undermine a worldview that is solidly Christ-centered. Sadly, an increasing number of Christians view reality (including the Christian faith) through the “lens” of a worldview that is more secular than it is centered on the heart, mind and ways of Jesus.

This issue of Equipper begins a new series of articles that, over the next few months, will explore the topic of worldview conversion. The focus of the series is how we, through what we refer to as whole-life discipleship, can first help ourselves and then help those in our care develop a  worldview that is fully Christ-centered.

This letter introduces the series, looking at what we mean by worldview and providing additional comments. I’ll then hand you over to Ted Johnston’s article in this issue for additional details. We’ll then build on this foundation in future articles published here in GCI Equipper.

What is a worldview?

In his book Naming the Elephant: Worldview as a Concept, James W. Sire offers this definition:

A worldview is a commitment, a fundamental orientation of the heart, that can be expressed as a story or in a set of presuppositions (assumptions which may be true or entirely false) which we hold (consciously or subconsciously, consistently or inconsistently) about the basic constitution of reality, and that provides the foundation on which we live and move and have our being. (p. 141)

Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog
(public domain via Wikimedia Commons)

Whether we know it or not, we all have a particular worldview. As disciples of Jesus, it is vital that we embrace and live out of a Christ-centered worldview, then help others do so as well. The articles in this series on worldview and whole-life discipleship are designed to help us do that. It is our goal that we will use this material to help our members identify their current worldview, then help them realign their worldview, as needed, more fully with Jesus’ own view of the world—his values, perspectives and commitments. As part of the series, we’ll look at some “hot button” ethical issues—seeking a Christ-centered response in ways that are redemptive rather than merely confrontational.

We pray that this series will help inform our teaching and preaching, leading to positive, Christ-centered, Spirit-led change in our own lives and in the lives of the people we are called to disciple in the way of Jesus.

A shift in worldview

In his helpful book God, Freedom & Human Dignity, Ron Highfield asks a penetrating question concerning the shift in worldview that has occurred within Western culture:

How, when and by whom did it come about that nature, family, community, moral law and religion were changed in the Western mind from identity-giving, happiness-producing networks of meaning into their opposites—self-alienating, misery-inducing webs of oppression? (p. 18)

The dominant worldview in the modern West in our day encourages people (particularly young ones) to cast off family and religious values to embrace an identity that is largely me-centered. This secular worldview, which has become one of the cornerstones of Western culture, is grounded in a form of self-expression that, rather than valuing higher good and right action, has become an end in itself. Highfield continues:

The modern self asserts. “I am irreplaceable, and none can tell me how to realize my own uniqueness or judge my choice or ways of self-expression. I have every right to celebrate my own utterly unique being in ways that I experience as fulfilling.” (p. 31)

The need for grace

A sad state of affairs, isn’t it? Yet, lest we point a finger of condemnation, let’s remember that all of us (due to our fallen nature) are inclined toward self-centeredness, and so are in need of God’s grace. Let’s also remember that our calling as followers of Jesus is not to rail against the culture, or to turn our backs on it in disgust. Instead, we are called to participate with Jesus, by the Spirit, in speaking redemptively into the lives of people—sharing with them not the bad news of a failed culture, but the good news of God’s culture—God’s kingdom. Note this comment from Highfield:

Approaching people with the least hint of judgment or arrogance or love of argument will fail to produce the desired engagement. In my experience, patient listening, sincere probing, and autobiographical confession is the only way to engage with our contemporaries in meaningful conversations about important matters. (p. 36)

Instead of buying into the culture’s propensity toward asserting our “rights” by being confrontational and condemning, we must reach out with the love of God to people, no matter their worldview, to help them discover and embrace Jesus and his beliefs and values. We want to help people experience the God who is revealed in Jesus Christ; to discover God’s plan to give them their true identity as his children, and thus to discover a way of life that is truly fulfilling and liberating. I pray that this series of articles on worldview will equip us to participate with Jesus in the disciple-making work that he is now doing in our world with its largely secular worldview.

Be sure to read the articles in this new series (you’ll find the first one, written by Ted Johnston, in this issue). As we proceed, I invite you to share your thoughts in the comment box that appears at the end of each article.

Seeking to embrace and share a Christ-centered worldview,
—Greg Williams, GCI Vice President


PS: Over the last several months, I’ve been casting a vision for what we refer to as healthy church. It’s my desire to help us examine the steps we’ll need to take in order to move toward the realization of that vision. In my Equipper letter last month I addressed one of those steps: the implementation within our congregations of adaptive leadership. This month, we’ve included an article in which I address the key issue of the faith, hope and love venues. I’ll be addressing additional topics in future issues. Please read these prayerfully, then discuss them with your leaders.

4 thoughts on “From Greg: Worldview Conversion”

  1. Thank you for providing this new series and sharing the Highfield quote, “…patient listening, sincere probing, and autobiographical confession is the only way to engage with our contemporaries in meaningful conversations about important matters”.On one occasion my autobiographical confession provoked a friend to challenge me by asking, “why would God save you!?” It’s possible I shared too much but asked him, “Do you think God loves me?” He remained skeptical but said God’s love for me was obvious. I asked him, “Does this help you understand why I love Jesus?” He kept his thoughts to himself but after considering the question said, “Yes. I can see why you love Jesus.” A couple years later he shared that our conversation helped him see he isn’t alone; that Jesus loves him too.

  2. I am looking forward to this exciting series as controversial issues are explored in the light of Christ and in the proper contexts.

  3. This is brilliant! A review of our worldview means that it might be refined or changed. We have been there before! What leadership to review this fundamental issue, how we look at the world around us, where we came from, who we are and where are we going. This promises to change our thinking, firstly into awe and private praise of our Triune God, followed by a flowing upward and outward into a corporate eruption of that old question, “Lord, what will you have me to do?” From that will flow evangelism amongst other things. Bring on the future!

  4. Positive, deep, article, I love a good challenge, I think this sums it up: “We are called to participate with Jesus, by the Spirit, in speaking redemptively into the lives of people—sharing with them not the bad news of a failed culture, but the good news of God’s culture—God’s kingdom.”

    That distinguished Gentleman from Mississippi,
    Billy Cooley
    A representative of the Kingdom of God

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